Mystic Marriage

MYSTIC MARRIAGE

Mino begs a gift of Poseidon and

from the sea comes a white bull.

Glorious Bull! With hooves of gold,

eyes of fire and sweet of breath.

Pasiphae, Mino’s wife

besotted with the sight of him

begs Mino to spare his sword

and offers her handmaidens

for the sacrifice.

Tender-hearted Mino allows his wife

to rule his judgement

all sense is pushed aside,

havoc soon overturns the throne.

Pasiphae builds a wooden cow

and besotted with lust

climbs into the decoy

Seduces the golden hoofed Bull.

The Minotaur is born, suckled from

Pasiphae’s paps,

grew wild –the labyrinth

built to imprison him.

Unnatural love- making produces

unnatural monster Minotaur

half man and half bull,

given freedom only in a maze,

fed on virgins of both sexes.

But Poseidon has the last laugh.

He was the gift, the snow white bull

and cuckolds Mino

for his greed.

Mystic marriage overturns a throne and kingdom,

reveals the deception of woman

produces monster offspring.

In his maze all paths lead to the grave.

Jane Kohut-Bartels

Copyrighted, 2009

2 Responses to “Mystic Marriage”

  1. Berowne Says:

    I like it. I’m wondering about the shift in tenses in

    The Minotaur is born, suckled from
    Pasiphae’s paps,
    grew wild

    After looking a bit, I realize that most of the verbs that look like past tense (“fed on virgins”) are participles, but not “grew”. Are you going for an effect there?

    Actually tense-shifting might be something to play around with; I recall a novel that used it, a little disorienting at first but makes the reader pay attention.

    Like

  2. ladynyo Says:

    You know what? I couldn’t get that damn poem to format correctly on wordpress….there are double spaces between stanzas, and damn, if it doesn’t just…run on.

    Tenses. I’ll take a look. “Mystic Marriage” was from last year about this time. Haven’t really had a good look-see on the poem and it’s due for one.

    Tune-ups for poetry! Why not? Nothing poetical is in stone.

    After looking a bit, I realize that most of the verbs that look like past tense (“fed on virgins”) are participles, but not “grew”. Are you going for an effect there?

    No, but it’s a handy idea!

    Thanks for reading this poem, and for your comments. This is EXACTLY what poets need…..critical eyes reading and good poetical issues pushed for thought!

    As far as tenses….I usually avoid them. Proper usage. Only upon a more critical read, or rewrite…..do I ever catch them. Sometimes.

    I think that ‘speech’ in poetry can transcend ‘rules’ where effect is achieved. And I also think that the word ‘lyrical’ can be understood in a couple of ways…..poetical.

    LOL~!

    Like

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