Ghazal for d’versepoets.com

Sort of.  I wrote this for a dear friend in India three years ago, but had no real idea of the structure, form of Ghazals.  But~!  I can learn…tomorrow.

The reference to “liver” comes from the Berbers.  They believe (still do) that the soul resides in the liver.  Works for me.

Lady Nyo

 

GHAZAL FOR AMAN

What are those lights?

They shine into the heart and even

As I cast down eyes,

Pierce my soul with exquisite pain!

Ah! It is the blessing of the Universe

Who has come to claim my heart, my soul.

Who has come to claim my liver.

Who am I to argue with such wisdom?

Is there not a web, gossamer as a spider’s

Silver wire that crosses from bush to bush,

Shining with prisms of light falling from

The morning dew?

Does not this silver thread, so fragile but eternal

Bond us together as Humanity?

The ways of the heart are mysterious.

They triumph over cold logic.

If we would just listen to the music,

Would let the stirrings of a grateful heart

We would dance in rebirth each day!

Ah! Pride destroyed

The soul made new

Resurrected each day

To meet heart with heart

To dissolve law into love –

Paradise enough for You.

Paradise enough for  Me.

Jane Kohut-Bartels

Copyrighted, 2008

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20 Responses to “Ghazal for d’versepoets.com”

  1. Daydreamertoo Says:

    Beautiful. I guess in reality the soul resides in us wherever it is. So, it could be in the liver, it could be everywhere within us, too.
    Lovely, light, ethereal, prose.

    Like

  2. Margie Says:

    Love it – I find it so interesting that the Japanese forms of poetry, while lovely and thoroughly enjoyable – don’t resonate with me the way the Middle Eastern type poetry does. Must have to do with past lives! LOL! Hope you are well!

    Like

  3. hedgewitch Says:

    This is an interesting one, lady Nyo, not anything like the form, but it has a lot of the same feel of associations, rather than narrative, driving, and some yearning is definitely there as well, for a unattainable or hard to obtain clarity and peace. i especially loved this image:

    Is there not a web, gossamer as a spider’s

    Silver wire that crosses from bush to bush,

    Shining with prisms of light falling from

    The morning dew?

    Like

  4. Kavita Says:

    Something very charming and sweet about this poem, Lady Nyo.. I could imagine lakes and lush greens.. a very picturesque image came to mind as I was reading this poem… lovely!

    Like

  5. tashtoo Says:

    I am no master of form…but I am an appreciator of well spun words. This has captured a piece of me. The language, the flow, (the aside about the liver) holds me fascinated! Beautiful, wondrous, powerful write! Love is the law 🙂

    Like

  6. ladynyo Says:

    Hi Tashtoo!

    Something very new in form for me….and the ‘spirit’ is more Persian/Ghazal…but not the form….LOL!!

    Thank you so much for liking these words…I am more acquainted with the Berber poems, some of the Persian, but not as much and certainly not enough to understand the form

    But we learn!!!

    And yes, Love over law…

    Hugs,
    Lady Nyo

    Like

  7. ladynyo Says:

    Thank you, Kavita.

    About the only thing ‘ghazal’ like of this one was the imagery…LOL!

    Thank you for reading and your lovely comment.

    Lady Nyo

    Like

  8. ladynyo Says:

    Hi Hedgewitch!

    No, there is no noticable ghazal form….lol! But! I do, also, associate the ghazal with yearning, storytelling, but perhaps that is more of the Persian?? (GREAT story tellers, second only to the Hungarians!!) I don’t know…it’s something I would like to study, but so much is in the way right now.

    Thank you, Joy….for you always insightful comments. I learn so much from your critique.
    Jane

    Like

  9. ladynyo Says:

    Hi Margie….I certainly understand your pull towards the Middle Eastern….LOL! Me, too…but it’s so different than the Japanese, neh?

    There is this twirling, turning passionate questioning of all nature, life, humanity….even of God! within the Persian literature…they really expand the possibilities of meer poetry.

    I am well, Margie love, just so damn hot here…Christopher is home….and is chafting at the Navy…but hell, there is nothing out there of jobs, and he needs to be grateful for the three meals, insurance and travel! LOL!

    He’s a blue blaze of leaving dirt around, lawnmower parts (once again) and like a nebish. The Navy hasn’t improved his habits one bit. But he’s home for a few days, and then gone again. Blessed child who is a pain in the neck on MY turf…LOL!

    Hugs,
    Jane

    Like

  10. ladynyo Says:

    Hi Daydreamertoo…

    I think you are right! How do we know about something intangible? We can’t pluck it out…with our bare hands, we can’t find it on Xray….but still we are saddled with it. I think it’s conscience. What do I know?

    I like the Berbers idea in the liver….I used to know more ‘why’, but I like the Berbers as a people, so I’m easy!

    Thank you for reading and your comment….Much appreciated.

    Lady Nyo

    Like

  11. Gay Says:

    My dear Lady
    Regardless of form your voice, always distinctive, is so pure and eloquent here. In addition to the lines Joy quotes I particularly liked: “Does not this silver thread, so fragile but eternal
    Bond us together as Humanity?
    The ways of the heart are mysterious.
    They triumph over cold logic.”

    I have been dwelling lately on duality of nature which seems to be part of life, not exclusive to humans. One sees temperaments in trees, plants, cats, dogs, and probably from what one can observe from the nature movies in wild animals as well. I think there is a silver thread of “spirit” if you will that connects all life to one another and perhaps to some larger spirit beyond.

    Well thought, and beautifully expressed.
    Thank you,
    Gay

    Like

  12. Henry Clemmons Says:

    I really liked this, a kool friendly aroma.

    http://henryclemmonspoet.blogspot.com/2011/08/churns-dream.html

    Like

  13. ladynyo Says:

    Thank you, Henry.

    Lady Nyo

    Like

  14. ladynyo Says:

    My dear Gay!

    You have expressed so well, what this poem only hinted at. It IS this uniting spirit….bound up in the (liver???) of all things. Our links go beyond our status on this earth: poor status it is if we isolate ourselves from all these other beings around us.

    And we do…and we needlessly suffer.

    I remember when I wrote this poem: I was playing the dumbeks. I was trying to follow some Turkish and Berber drummers on a cd, and this always transports me into ‘some other place’. I know now that this ‘place’ is found when we enter it through Hyperarousal Trance…dance, drumming, twirlling like the dervishes….when we ‘misplace’ our conscious and critical mind and just …well…’let go’.

    You are a musician so you would understand this profoundly. The ayoub beat is always the entrance for me…like the Heart Beat of the Universe!

    Thank you, Gay, for your words on your own pathways and thoughts. We are all connected in some profound and intangible way.
    Peace,
    Jane

    Like

  15. Steve Isaak Says:

    Good versifying. Enjoyed this a lot. =)

    Like

  16. ladynyo Says:

    Hi Steve!!

    Unfortunately, it is no example of a ghazal. I wrote it during “The Zar Tale”….and the Berber versifiying was a big pull then…and now. But it is no Persian Ghazal! LOL!

    Though the Zar character (a couple of them…) in “The Zar Tale” had studied with Rumi…..LOL! Obviously he was more Berber than Persian in poetry.

    Thank you, friend Steve. How are you?

    Jane

    Like

  17. Mama Zen Says:

    “Ah! It is the blessing of the Universe

    Who has come to claim my heart, my soul.

    Who has come to claim my liver.

    Who am I to argue with such wisdom?”

    Love this!

    Like

  18. ladynyo Says:

    Thank you, Mama Zen….’

    It’s more Berber than Persian, but we learn, we learn.

    LOL!

    Thank you for reading this and your comment.

    Lady Nyo

    Like

  19. John (@bookdreamer) Says:

    Lovely song like quality and one of yearning but its structure isn’t that of the classical or modern ghazal. Agha Shahid Ali’s, chapter from An Exaltation of forms (Ed Finch and Varnes) will tell you more. And this is a poem of his based on the traditional rules. http://www.poetryfoundation.org/poem/172051

    Like

  20. ladynyo Says:

    Thank you, John…

    I’ll look at that poem, etc. My forte is tanka, and ghazal would need a lot of research from here. This poem is more freeverse.

    Lady Nyo

    Like

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